Vocation In A Pandemic

Note: I am a board member in an organization named KIROS, a Christians in Business group in Seattle aimed at connecting, encouraging, and equipping Christians to integrate their faith with their business and career. This is a letter I sent to the community regarding my thoughts on the crisis.

One of the things I appreciate most about KIROS is the diversity of vocation present in the community. We are often siloed in our vocations while we’re at our places of business. Engineers work with engineers. Accountants work with accountants. In our churches we have a diversity of vocation, but a singular focus when we worship together. KIROS gives me a way to think of what it means to be a Christian at work alongside people of different vocations.

But recently, it seems to me, we have a different kind of diversity in our community: many of us have had our vocations radically changed, and in short order. Some of us are not able to work like we used to. Some of us were accountants, but are now homeschool teachers. Some of us still work in the same vocation, but what our work entails looks entirely different. Instead of trying to expand our businesses, some of us may be looking to keep it afloat. We are all having to make hard decisions about our career, our business, our customers, our employees, and how we help our community.

This reminds me of a sermon by CS Lewis in Weight of Glory named “Learning in Wartime”. The sermon was given to students at Oxford in the thick of World War II, attempting to answer some of the basic questions we often have when trying to persevere through a crisis: Do I continue on as if this isn’t a big deal? How do I keep focused on what is in front of me? I wish this had never happened, why am I going through this? What about all of my plans, when can I get back to them?

These are very real concerns, and Lewis doesn’t dismiss them. He writes that

A more Christian attitude… is that of leaving futurity in God’s hands. We may as well, for God will certainly retain it whether we leave it to Him or not. Never, in peace or war, commit your virtue or your happiness to the future. Happy work is best done by the man who takes his long-term plans somewhat lightly and works from moment to moment “as to the Lord”. It is only our daily bread that we are encouraged to ask for. The present is the only time in which any duty can be done or any grace received.

That is, he suggests that the Christian walk is about doing our vocation, whatever that may be, dutifully in the present. That is in fact exactly our duty in all circumstances, crisis or not. As to the questions “Why me? Why us? Why now?”, Lewis has an encouraging word:

The work of a Beethoven, and the work of a charwoman, become spiritual on precisely the same condition, that of being offered to God, of being done humbly “as to the Lord”. This does not, of course, mean that it is for anyone a mere toss-up whether he should sweep rooms or compose symphonies. A mole must dig to the glory of God and a cock must crow. We are members of one body, but differentiated members, each with his own vocation. A man’s upbringing, his talents, his circumstances, are usually a tolerable index of his vocation.

Our backgrounds, our talent, and our circumstances were ordained by God for all moments, certainly, but also this one. The decisions we make regarding our families, work, and community were given to us by God, and we should be encouraged that this was done with a purpose. We should remind ourselves that even though we, like those terrified students at Oxford in 1939, may wish this wasn’t our burden it was nonetheless given to us for a reason. God prepared us for our part to play in it.

Whatever your vocation looks like now, I think we should heed Lewis’ advice and remember that all of our work becomes “spiritual on precisely the same condition, that of being offered to God, of being done humbly “as to the Lord”. This is true even, and maybe especially, if it wasn’t the work that we planned to be doing.

4 thoughts on “Vocation In A Pandemic”

  1. Thanks for sharing this. I’m reminded of a quote by Timothy Keller that says: “But in Genesis we see God as a gardener, and in the New Testament we see him as a carpenter. No task is too small a vessel to hold the immense dignity of work given by God.” As a reminder that no matter what we do or in what capacity it can be immensely meaningful knowing the we are fulfilling a higher calling to please God in through our work.

    1. Totally agree, I love that quote. We were meant to work, and that as an offering to God that is truly, deeply meaningful, no matter what it is that we are called to do.

  2. So you’re saying that after losing our jobs, we can now remind ourselves to work for God? That’s pretty ironic considering Church is shut down, and God doesn’t want you to talk to anyone without safety equipment.

    1. Work is more encompassing than a job, though our jobs are an important part of our work. For a lot of us, what we are doing in our work is a lot different now than it was before. Nonetheless, you are still working.

      Whether or not you’re able to go to church, Paul writes “And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him”. That includes whatever work is in front of you at the moment, whether or not that work entails a paycheck.

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